Sass 3.3 is Released

After ironing out a bunch of bugs in numerous release candidates, we’re finally ready to release Sass 3.3.0, codename Maptastic Maple, for public consumption.

To get things rocking on your end all you need to do is hop into the terminal and run:

gem update sass

Massive props to all the contributors!

Spirit

Jeremy Keith:

Every so often, some smart, talented web designers will bemoan the lack of recognition afforded to their craft, industry, work. They wish for the same level of respect that architects or film-makers get, or for the iconic status given to the best of the advertising world’s output in decades past.

Be careful what you wish for, I say. Not only are these the same industries that are rife with horrible business practices like spec work, they are notoriously unfair when it comes to praising individual achievement over the efforts of the group. Worst of all, the proliferation of high-profile awards leads to the practice of producing “award-winning work” i.e. work designed purely to win awards.

I’ve had the same thoughts for sometime, but never had the guts to express them. Thanks Jeremy!

Bulletproof Accessible Icon Fonts

Zach Leatherman:

Care must be taken when implementing icon fonts to ensure a great experience for all users. What happens when your font doesn’t load? What happens when @font-face isn’t supported in the browser?

Another very informative article with a nice easy-to-include library.

Grumpicon – A Web app for the Grunticon workflow.

Grumpicon is a browser-based app. Just drag and drop your SVG files onto the browser window and it will return a downloadable zip that mirrors the output you’d get from the command-line tool.

Big ups to the Filament Group and Eric Ponto!

Front-End Ops

A front-end operations engineer is not a title you’ve likely come across, but hopefully one that you will. Such a person would need to be an expert at serving and hosting front-end resources. They’d need to be pros at Grunt (or something similar) and have strong opinions about modules. They would find the best ways to piece together the parts of a Web application, and they’d be pros at versioning, caching and deployment.

A front-end operations engineer would own external performance. They would be critical of new HTTP requests, and they would constantly be measuring file size and page-load time. They wouldn’t necessarily always worry about the number of times that a loop can run in a second — that’s still an application engineer’s job. They own everything past the functionality.

One for the front-end developers out there. With more application logic being deferred to the client side, Alex Sexton makes the case that front-end developers should transition to front-end operation engineers; becoming “the bridge between an application’s intent and an application’s reality”.

Chrome DevTools Revolutions 2013

Paul Irish:

As the complexity of the web apps you build keeps moving, so do the Chrome DevTools. We’ll give you the latest update on your favorite companion; explore new features like emulating mobile devices, remote debugging, Canvas and WebGL profiling, Sass preprocessor support, developing completely within Chrome using the new Workspaces support, and 20 other features that are brand-new to you and will hugely improve your development.

Make time for this one if you use the dev tools. The future is bright!

Blink: A rendering engine for the Chromium project

Chromium blog:

Chromium uses a different multi-process architecture than other WebKit-based browsers, and supporting multiple architectures over the years has led to increasing complexity for both the WebKit and Chromium projects. This has slowed down the collective pace of innovation – so today, we are introducing Blink, a new open source rendering engine based on WebKit.

In the short term, Blink will bring little change for web developers. The bulk of the initial work will focus on internal architectural improvements and a simplification of the codebase. For example, we anticipate that we’ll be able to remove 7 build systems and delete more than 7,000 files—comprising more than 4.5 million lines—right off the bat. Over the long term a healthier codebase leads to more stability and fewer bugs.

The Chromium team are moving forward at an alarming rate and are doing everything to continue. Smart move.

How to Lose Weight (in the browser)

The definitive front-end performance guide.

A group of highly talented individuals from companies like Google, Opera and Twitter have put together a great resource that will no doubt become a ‘go-to’ source for getting your site in shape.

Introducing Preboot

Say hello to Mark Otto’s (creator of Bootstrap) reborn project.

Preboot is a comprehensive and flexible collection of LESS utilities. Its original variables and mixins became the precursor to Bootstrap. Since then, it’s all come full circle.

If you roll with LESS then this will no doubt become a handy resource to help you write better CSS.