Author: Jake Bresnehan

Web Design Weekly #134

Headlines Dream On A very positive and inspiring piece by Mark Otto on why he gets excited about helping people build rad stuff. (markdotto.com) Write Code Every Day (ejohn.org) Free Tutorials – Learn Graphic, Web Design, Marketing and more! For a limited time Skillfeed is offering access to all courses and tutorials for FREE! Creative […]

Dream On

Mark Otto: My dream is to help awesome people do awesome shit. Nothing else gets me more stoked out of my mind than that. I get goosebumps thinking about how much the web has changed and how we can continue to shape it just by writing code and sharing our experiences. A very positive and […]

Web Design Weekly #133

The super talented Ben Schwarz just pulled the curtains back on his latest project – Calibre. Rik Cabanier gives a lowdown on a number of new 2D Canvas features. Andrew Clarke covers four lessons that can help us do what we do better. Brian Rinaldi discusses ways to avoid getting overwhelmed by all the new shiny tools, libraries and frameworks. Brian Cooksey released a great course on APIs and so much more. Enjoy!

Grid Frameworks for Sass

This article is not about whether you should or shouldn’t use a Sass grid. It’s about showcasing a few options that are worth investigating if you do decide to go down that path.

The amount of grid systems out in the wild is quite outstanding. Some are super light weight and some are bloated nightmares. With so much choice it’s really hard to decided which one is right and is something that shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Web Design Weekly #132

Rich Tibbet breaks down and explains virtual reality in the browser. Ben Frain explains why the latest implementation of Flexbox is slower than CSS table layout. Harry Roberts looks at ways to name UI components in OOCSS. Flipboard blogged about their layout engine – Duplo. Nicholas Zakas released the beginning of his “Understanding ECMAScript 6″ book and so much more. Enjoy!

Throttle Bandwidth for Testing

Working with a fast internet connection on a day-to-day basis is a real privilege. it’s easy to forget that others are less fortunate.

With a recent vacation to “slow internet land” this really hit home. So much so, once being back in “fast internet land” I explored the different ways to throttle bandwidth for testing.

After a little research, here are few different methods that I discovered.

Choose tools you’ll use

Addy Osmani: If you’re new to front-end development, I suggest staying close to the grain: just use HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Build with them, learn them inside out, experiment with them. These languages have some amazing primitives that we sometimes forget the raw power of. With so many tools being released every week it sure […]

Web Design Weekly #131

Nicolas Gallagher blogged about the benefits of using custom CSS processing. Tim Kadlec discussed why Responsive Web Design looks like Responsive Web Design. Matt Quinn looks into the processes of moving from PHP to Node.JS. Val Head dives into modular CSS animations and loads more. Enjoy!

Shaping CSS

In someway or another we are exposed to CSS on a daily basis. Either by tinkering with some code, reading a technical blog post or just viewing the source files of a site.

Over the years CSS has really evolved and I thought it might be a good time to stop and take a look at some of the key players in our industry. The ones that are helping shape the direction.

Custom CSS preprocessing

Nicolas Gallagher: Did you know that you can build your own CSS preprocessor with Node.js libraries? They can be used alongside established preprocessors like Sass, and are useful for defining tasks beyond preprocessing. A great insight into some of the benefits of using tools like Rework to help manipulate CSS during development.

Web Design Weekly #130

Trent Walton passes on some great thoughts about how we should be considering maximum reach even if out final results are a little underwhelming. Sass 3.3 dropped. Chris Coyier blogged about a cool icon system with SVG sprites. Hugo Giraudel explores error handling in Sass. TJ VanToll looks at jQuery on mobile devices. Enjoy.

Your own device lab today

During the last few years there has been no shortage of devices being released to the market. For us this was a new challenge and we all stepped up to the plate by adding device specific media queries to our stylesheets.

This was possible in “the good old days”…

Web Design Weekly #129

Peter Gasston give a great overview on the future of Custom Elements. Hugo Giraudel explores was to set you your Sass architecture. Mark Otto updated his handy code guide. Paul Lewis shared his process for doing performance audits. Robin Hawkes blogged about all the lessons learnt during the development of ViziCities and loads more. Enjoy.

Sass 3.3 is Released

After ironing out a bunch of bugs in numerous release candidates, we’re finally ready to release Sass 3.3.0, codename Maptastic Maple, for public consumption.

To get things rocking on your end all you need to do is hop into the terminal and run:

gem update sass

Massive props to all the contributors!

Web Design Weekly #128

The talented team at GitHub have released a new text editor called Atom. The Chrome team announced that Responsive images are coming. Ben Frain looked into CSS performance. Kyle Peatt dived into the off-canvas pattern. Rachet 2 was released and Paul Irish looked into some CSS performance tips.

Web Design Weekly #127

Paul Lewis gave a great insight into the new property called ‘will-change’. Chris Coyier covered how SVG line animations work. Daniel Mall dived into what Creative Direction means in a digital context. Some awesome tools were also released like PNG Hat, FontPrep and Recordit. A it was a big week!

Web Design Weekly #126

Jordan Lewis from Envato wrote about some of the solutions they have put in place to progressively convert the Marketplaces to be responsive. Joel Hooks wrote gave a good argument on why you should stop writing loops and start using Underscore.js. Eric Mann put a proposal together for an editor to work offline with WordPress. Adam Kaplan create a very basic easy to follow guide for responsive design. Yelp released a front-end style guide and more.

Web Design Weekly #125

Ilya Grigorik dives into the optimisation of web fonts. Hans Christian Reinl explores the downsides of placing CSS in your HTML head instead of referencing external files. Hugo Giraudel dives into Sass mixin’s and placeholders. Anna Debenham goes into detail on why you should build design systems and pattern libraries for your projects and so much more. Enjoy!

Respond Recap

During Web Directions South 2013 I noticed an interesting twitter conversation between John Allsopp and Ethan Marcotte. Unfortunately I don’t have the patience to find that conversation but the general gist was Ethan wishing John all the best for the conference and dropping the hint that he would one day love to come to Australia.

I had a little inkling that maybe he might be out for a future Web Directions South, but to my surprise, and many others, John and Maxine, the team behind the Web Directions conferences, decided to mash together a one-of-a-kind (maybe there will be another??) conference focusing on Responsive Web Design. Oh boy, did they pull together an awesome lineup!

Spirit

Jeremy Keith:

Every so often, some smart, talented web designers will bemoan the lack of recognition afforded to their craft, industry, work. They wish for the same level of respect that architects or film-makers get, or for the iconic status given to the best of the advertising world’s output in decades past.

Be careful what you wish for, I say. Not only are these the same industries that are rife with horrible business practices like spec work, they are notoriously unfair when it comes to praising individual achievement over the efforts of the group. Worst of all, the proliferation of high-profile awards leads to the practice of producing “award-winning work” i.e. work designed purely to win awards.

I’ve had the same thoughts for sometime, but never had the guts to express them. Thanks Jeremy!