Blink: A rendering engine for the Chromium project

Chromium blog:

Chromium uses a different multi-process architecture than other WebKit-based browsers, and supporting multiple architectures over the years has led to increasing complexity for both the WebKit and Chromium projects. This has slowed down the collective pace of innovation – so today, we are introducing Blink, a new open source rendering engine based on WebKit.

In the short term, Blink will bring little change for web developers. The bulk of the initial work will focus on internal architectural improvements and a simplification of the codebase. For example, we anticipate that we’ll be able to remove 7 build systems and delete more than 7,000 files—comprising more than 4.5 million lines—right off the bat. Over the long term a healthier codebase leads to more stability and fewer bugs.

The Chromium team are moving forward at an alarming rate and are doing everything to continue. Smart move.

Web Design Weekly #82

Big bad Trent Walton was interviewed by The Great Discontent. Awesome interview. Michiel de Graff explains how to you the animations with Sass and @while. Paul Stamatiou has another epic post about developing a responsive, retina site.Andy Clarke released Rock Hammer and loads more. Big week!

Web Design Weekly #81

The weeks seem to be getting bigger and better. Thankfully I dig curating the best content every week. I can’t believe it’s already issue #81!. Without further ado. A few big guns from some of the top companies released Browser Diet which is a great resource to get your site into shape. Jordan Moore discusses a few of the lesser practised elements in responsible web design. A great discussion about the jQuery CDN on the HTML5 GitHub repository and so much more. Enjoy!

How to Lose Weight (in the browser)

The definitive front-end performance guide.

A group of highly talented individuals from companies like Google, Opera and Twitter have put together a great resource that will no doubt become a ‘go-to’ source for getting your site in shape.

Web Design Weekly #80

Lots of focus back on the Responsive Design World this week. Elliot Jay Stocks kicked it off with an awesome post about how we have just wasted a good number of years forcing fixed pixels on to a responsive framework. Richard Clark on the HTML5 Doctor walked through input types, Paul Irish gives the low down on WebKit, Ben Kamens looked at the finer details of the Amazon drop down and also the Web Standards Project called it a day. Enjoy.

Going Static with Jekyll & Deploying via GitHub for Free

During the last six months I have been meaning to play around with one of the many static site generators to see what all the hype is about. After a bit of research I decided to head down the Jekyll path. A fair few people tend to be using Octopress and Kirby but my main reason for choosing Jekyll was this little ‘Static Site Generators‘ gist put together by Dave Rupert. In my eyes, the fact that Jekyll has the biggest community behind it gives it the winning edge, especially for when help is needed.

Turns out, Jekyll is rad! It’s a simple, blog aware, static site generator built in Ruby. It takes a template directory, runs it through Textile or Markdown and Liquid converters, and spits out a complete, static website.

Web Design Weekly #79

So much awesomeness this week it was hard to decided what made the cut. Thankfully I still managed. The W3C did an amazing job in quickly turning around the videos from the W3Conf. A hot debate about responsive design on branch started by Noah Stokes with lots of big guns adding their 2 cents. Chrome 26 beta dropped. A great typography started kit, Typeplate was released and so much more. Enjoy.

Introducing Preboot

Say hello to Mark Otto’s (creator of Bootstrap) reborn project.

Preboot is a comprehensive and flexible collection of LESS utilities. Its original variables and mixins became the precursor to Bootstrap. Since then, it’s all come full circle.

If you roll with LESS then this will no doubt become a handy resource to help you write better CSS.


Jonathan Neal (co-creator of Normalize.css) put the source in the source so you can view the source while you view source. Super handy for people that tend to view the internet by its source.

Sun – Simple HTML5 Weather App

An awesome HTML5 iPhone weather app. Just visit the site from your iPhone and then save it to your home screen. Seems to be a little sluggish but don’t let this put you off. Beautifully executed.