Archive

Twitter Bootstrap 2.1.0 released

Twitter Bootstrap Blog:

New docs, affix plugin, submenus on dropdowns, block buttons, image styles, fluid grid offsets, new navbar, increased font-size and line-height, 120+ closed bugs, and more. Go get it.

Web Design Weekly #56

Huge week! Peter Gasston explains how we can learn to love the boring bits of CSS, John Resig announced his new big project, Tab Atkins talks about the state of CSS variables, Dan Mall shares his responsive line break trick, Sass 3.2 is released, Normalize.css v1 drops and a bucket load more. Enjoy.

Understanding technical debt

Nicholas C. Zakas:

In the worst case, tech debt can accumulate to the point where the web application is destined to fail. A classic tech debt issue is scalability. Initially, the goal is to get the web application up and running so that anyone can use it. Decisions are made to allow that to happen. But an app that can handle 100 users isn’t built the same way as an app to handle 1,000,000 users. In the back of the developers’ minds are a list of things that need to happen in order to scale out: hit the database less, implementing several layers of caching, reduce the size of responses, figure out a faster way to process orders, and so on.

Just like monetary debt, tech debt is best dealt with before it gets too large and overwhelming. Regularly tending to tech debt is a process I like to call code hygiene. If you don’t go to the dentist for ten years and then finally go, chances are you’ll be in for a nasty surprise by not practicing proper dental hygiene. Code hygiene is the same. Keeping on top of your tech debt means regularly going in and addressing what you can with the time available.

Great article to pass onto your manager.

Web Design Weekly #55

The another big week. Matt Mullenweg presents the State of the Word once again. Luke Wroblewski re-caps Brad Frost’s presentation ‘Beyond Media Queries’ at An Event Apart in Washington. The Adobe Web Platform team were busy blogging about some of their new CSS proposals. Marcin Wichary shared his experience in developing the awesome ‘Jumping the Hurdles’ doodle with the Gamepad API and loads more. Enjoy.

Web Design Weekly #54

Another great week in the web design world. A group of very talented developers helped bring the People Magazine’s website into responsive land, HTML5Rocks was open sourced and now live on Github, Addy Osmani takes us on a journey through the JavaScript MVC jungle, Christian Cantrell from Adobe gives us the lowdown on Chrome Flags, Joshua Hibbert created PacMan in CSS and loads more. Enjoy!

Lea Verou joins W3C

Lea:

Working at W3C had been a dream of mine ever since I learned what a web standard is. As you probably know if you’ve been following my work, I’m a strong believer in open web standards. Even though proprietary technology might offer some short term benefits, in the long run only open standards can allow the Web to reach its full potential.

The web is in good hands!

Web Design Weekly #53

The week of the interviews and boy-oh-boy they are good. The Great Discontent interviewed Yaron Schoen who is the design lead at Twitter. Oliver Reichenstein from Information Architects was interviewed on The Verge.

Also a few other goodies. Safari 6 dropped, JS Bin was updated, Elyse Holladay showed the world her Style Guide Guide and Kyle Steed posted his awesome time lapse video. Big week, enjoy!

Web Design Weekly #52

Harry Roberts gives some good reasons on why we should be specific with our CSS selectors, Typekit releases some new and improved embed code, Modernizr 2.6 is shipped, Rick Monro proposes a responsive web design garden and a lot, lot more. Enjoy.

Web Design Weekly #51

WDW 51. A complete list of all the Google I/O sessions, the Motorola Mobility team releases Montage, Dan Eden shares his thoughts on CSS Preprocessors and a truck load more. Enjoy.

Mass-unprefixing in Firefox 16

Paul Rouget:

In Firefox 16, we are unprefixing:

  • CSS3 Animations
  • CSS3 Transitions
  • CSS3 Transforms
  • CSS3 Gradients
  • IndexedDB

Also calc() might be unprefixed as well if time permits.

The Firefox team have been working hard!

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