Archive

Prototyping Responsive Typography

Viljami Salminen:

Basically, a typography prototype is a single web page that consists of the project’s actual content. It’s designed in the browser using real web fonts and tools like Typecast. A typography prototype includes font choices, styles for the basic text content and a typographic scale, but nothing else.

Having an approach that focuses on the most important part of any website is fundamental to producing an outstanding experience. It’s so simple but many avoid it. Me included.

The finished typography prototype will be used as the foundation for the rest of our work. We have the recipe, and now we need to start thinking how the colours and the layout will be cooked. This way, when we start our work from the most crucial parts — the content and the typography — and build everything else up from that point, there’s much less chance that we will get lost along the way.

I know where I am starting my next project.

Building Twitter Bootstrap

Mark Otto:

Bootstrap had its first practical test in real-world use at Twitter’s first Hackweek. During the week, I helped a few folks use Bootstrap on their projects to speed up development, but had no idea how effective or widespread the toolkit would become. When all the teams got in front of the company to present their ideas, dozens of them were using Bootstrap. They had used Bootstrap to create projects that all felt like a family of ideas with a consistent design and implementation. A simple, well-designed, and documented toolkit saved countless hours with little to no help from a dedicated designer.

An amazing product that is the leader in teams of frameworks. I think we all owe Mark and Jacob a beer.

Web Design Weekly #78

Can’t believe it nearing the end of February. This week is no exception. Lots of crazy good web development happening. Great article by Paul Irish about continuous painting mode for paint profiling. Chris Coyier looks at the old and new Flexbox syntax for the best results. Yeoman 1.0 was released. Typehead.js was released by the team at twitter and loads more. Enjoy.

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Using Flexbox

Chris Coyier:

Flexbox is pretty awesome and is certainly part of the future of layout. The syntax has changed quite a bit over the past few years, hence the “Old” and “New” syntax. But if we weave together the old, new, and in-between syntaxes, we can get decent browser support. Especially for a simple and probably the most common use case: order-controlled grids.

The old dog is up to his old tricks. Digging deep into the finner points of cutting edge CSS. Great post if you want to dive into Flexbox now.

Web Design Weekly #77

Massive week. Opera announces that it will make a gradual transition to the WebKit engine. Lots of great articles, for and against. Trent Walton explains where to start when taking on your next responsive web design project. Sacha Greif dives into flat pixels and Addy Osmani wrote a great article about optimising paint times for your pages. Enjoy!

Web Design Weekly #76

These weeks seem to be getting bigger and bigger. Maybe everyone is winding up for the year. This week Jeremy Keith wrote about the issues with the ‘main’ element. Cennydd Boweles talked about why we should look beyond user-centered design.Florian Boesch had a great piece on why we should use WebGL and the team at Twitter released Flight. Enjoy!

A Walk with Paul Irish

Have you ever wanted to know what’s inside other web developers’ heads? Have you ever wanted to catch up with someone that is an industry leader and an all-round awesome guy? How about a walk around the back streets of California with Paul Irish?

I flicked over a few questions to Paul in the hope of getting some answers. He took it too the next level.

Web Design Weekly #75

Well the big boys at A List Apart released version 5 of their site. More talk about performance. Sublime Text 3 beta was released. Oli Studholme wrote an awesome article on the Pastry Box and Tumblr upgraded their dashboard. Enjoy.

But what about soul?

Yaron Schoen :

It is recommended to build your web app taking aesthetics into account. If your couch is extremely comfortable, but looks really disgusting, no one will want to sit on it. So obviously if your site is a serious publication, but you use Comic Sans, it’s going to be hard to take you seriously.

But what about soul?

Using the proper techniques will always yield good results. But perhaps what turns a good product into a great one is the culture that is injected by the creator’s soul and need for expression.

Too true.