Web Design Weekly #88

Another big week. The CSS Zen Garden is back! Adobe are killing Fireworks. Paul Lewis takes a quick look at what can trigger painting in the browser and how you can prevent unnecessary paints from taking place. Drew Barontini goes over the details about setting up Sublime Text and loads more. Enjoy!

Web Design Weekly #87

Headlines Gallery CSS A simple, maintainable and understandable gallery without the use of JavaScript. So awesome. Ben Schwarz released the code on Github for free but covers all the details in a 40 minute screencast for a small fee which I would highly recommend. ( The Modern Web Peter Gasston’s The Modern Web will guide […]

Web Design Weekly #86

Not a massive week but some very notable releases and articles. The jQuery team have been hard at it dropping jQuery 2.0 which drops support for IE/6/7/8. Ben Taylor blogged about how we should be animating with physics. The awesome team at Bocoup wrote about the dimensions of web design. Also the high scalabitly blog wrote about the behind the scenes of Pintrest.

Web Design Weekly #85

Some movement in HTML5 Spec with the removal of the hgroup elements. Alex Sexton blogged about JavaScript Inheritance. John Siracusa wrote about the web rendering landscape. Harry Roberts had some great ideas about organising your CSS hacks and loads more. Enjoy!

Web Design Weekly #84

Lots of responsive goodness this week. Ian Storm Taylor shared a brilliant article about his thoughts about media queries being a hack. A nice responsive navigation plugin was released. Lea Verou shared he thoughts on the current state of gradient prefixes. Tab Atkins blogged about element queries and Alex MacCaw shared his tips on how to set up Sublime Text 2. Big week.

Why You Scared of Sass?

During a discussion a few weeks ago with an amazing front-end developer I was blown away that they hadn’t even given CSS preprocessing a go. I was bamboozled.

Learning something new, be it Sass, Less, YUI, Grunt, etc can always be a little daunting but making the time to ‘try’ is an important part of developing for the web.

If you get overwhelmed with all these new fandangle ‘things’ people are talking about, be mindful that you don’t necessarily have to adopt them. Having a basic understanding and awareness of what they do is all you really need to know. If the ‘thing’ really fits into your development workflow, then it’s a win. Dedicating more time to really learn and adopt it should be a no brainer. If it doesn’t, then at least you have the peace of mind that you’re not doing things in a inefficient manner.

Unique Post Styling with Jekyll

The other day Dave Rupert blogged about his new JavaScript plugin TimeJump. The Timejump post was a nice little read but the thing that caught my eye was the amount of time he had spent styling the post.

I have been following Dave’s development for a while now and have been keeping an especially close eye on his work with Jekyll.

Web Design Weekly #83

Massive week in regards to browsers! The Chrome team announced that they will be forking WebKit and moving to Blink. Mozilla & Samsung also announced that they are working on a new rendering engine. In general news, Brad Frost did a video interview for WDW. Philip Walton shared some strategies for dealing with CSS. Alex Sexton published an awesome post about deploying JavaScript applications. Dave Rupert blogged about responsive web design deliverables and so much more. Enjoy!

Catching up with Brad Frost

Brad Frost is one of those web developers that always seems to be one step ahead of the game. His personal site is a hive of interesting thoughts, especially in the responsive design arena. All his side projects are super helpful and his passion for our industry is contagious.

I fired a few questions over to Brad and he kindly sat down with his good pal Ziggy to give us all some sound advice.

Blink: A rendering engine for the Chromium project

Chromium blog:

Chromium uses a different multi-process architecture than other WebKit-based browsers, and supporting multiple architectures over the years has led to increasing complexity for both the WebKit and Chromium projects. This has slowed down the collective pace of innovation – so today, we are introducing Blink, a new open source rendering engine based on WebKit.

In the short term, Blink will bring little change for web developers. The bulk of the initial work will focus on internal architectural improvements and a simplification of the codebase. For example, we anticipate that we’ll be able to remove 7 build systems and delete more than 7,000 files—comprising more than 4.5 million lines—right off the bat. Over the long term a healthier codebase leads to more stability and fewer bugs.

The Chromium team are moving forward at an alarming rate and are doing everything to continue. Smart move.